Scene Stealers go outside the box in Urinetown

(THE PICKET)—Urinetown has a large order to fill as a show because it tells the tale of a dystopian society in which one is required to pay to use a toilet. It’s loaded with memorable songs, great comedic laughs and a greater social message.

Scene Stealers first time director Austin Susman valiantly tackles the task with great enthusiasm, even when attempting to take a larger than life show to the small minimalist stage of the train station in Shepherdstown.

Hope Wolfford performs as Penelope Pennywise during the musical number "It's a Privilege to Pee" in the play Urinetown.
JESSICA SHARPLESS/ The Picket
Hope Wolfford performs as Penelope Pennywise during the musical number “It’s a Privilege to Pee” in the play Urinetown.

Harry Koval gives a compelling performance as the narrator and villainous henchman Officer Lockstock, making the best of limited lighting at the venue and drawing attention to his vocal performances in the opening number of “Too Much Exposition.”

Hope Wolford gives a more detailed run down in the day to day of the character, Penelope Pennywise, in her challenging performance of “It’s a Privilege to Pee.”

Gregg Havenner as Mr. Cladwell presents the show’s obvious critique of some larger consequences of capitalism in a comic way with the laughable performance of “Don’t be the Bunny.”

Hope Wolford and Lance Wines perform during the play Urinetown, put on by the Shepherd Scene Stealers.
JESSICA SHARPLESS/The Picket
Hope Wolford and Lance Wines perform during the play Urinetown, put on by the Shepherd Scene Stealers.

The show drives through higher action and character death to make its points about freedom, capitalism, Marxist ideals, and our responses to them.

The Scene Stealers take on a larger than life task and bring it back down to the smaller intimate space of their performance but maintain its greater point as a show with a message.

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